Dogtown London at Trinity Food Court, Leeds – By Geraldine Greenwood

The Beef Chicago

When I approach the counter and make my request the bar man looks me in the eye and checks I am aware that it needs no condiments. No ketchup and no mayonnaise indeed? I was in for a new kind of hotdog. A brick red sausage, made of pork from rare breed pigs, rests in a super soft bun, two rows of tomato stand to attention at either side of the sausage while cooked onions protect the meat from a cool gherkin tamponade. The arrangement is delicately peppered and decorated with dill seeds. The eatery is a pop-up where wire netting, corrugated steel and a cut out skyline over the hot plates are reminiscent of a ghettoized US inner city suburb. I begin to question whether this fast food pop up really themed around the Dogtown slum in West Los Angeles, where surfing and skateboarding met? It is a hostile piece of design but rectangular signage recalls the oblong fun box, the floor is the cool off-white of newly set concrete.

Hot Dog Review -Dogtown London at Trinity Food Court, Leeds

Hot Dog Review – Dogtown London at Trinity Food Court, Leeds

When I approach the counter and make my request the bar man looks me in the eye and checks I am aware that it needs no condiments. No ketchup and no mayonnaise indeed? I was in for a new kind of hotdog. A brick red sausage, made of pork from rare breed pigs, rests in a super soft bun, two rows of tomato stand to attention at either side of the sausage while cooked onions protect the meat from a cool gherkin tamponade. The arrangement is delicately peppered and decorated with dill seeds. The eatery is a pop-up where wire netting, corrugated steel and a cut out skyline over the hot plates are reminiscent of a ghettoized US inner city suburb. I begin to question whether this fast food pop up really themed around the Dogtown slum in West Los Angeles, where surfing and skateboarding met? It is a hostile piece of design but rectangular signage recalls the oblong fun box, the floor is the cool off-white of newly set concrete. The background music a jingly pop beat, which paired with intense artificial light, transports you to Venice beach. The long Powerflex skateboard shaped bun appears to be speckled with sand like polenta and is the sliced tomato symbolically representing the Powell Peralta logo, I ask myself… Does the hot dog reference skateboarding legend Jim “Red Dog” Muir? Could the near luminous tamponade like dressing be a reference to Dexter Green, often consider one of the first black surfers and early member of the Zephyr skate team? This hotdog cocked a snook at revisionist sport histories and indeed prevailing hot dog orthodoxy. Though when I revisited a week later to re-assess my initial theories Dogtown London had move on.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s